About your Search

20131028
20131105
STATION
CNNW 11
CSPAN 8
KGO (ABC) 7
MSNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN2 3
KNTV (NBC) 2
WJZ (CBS) 2
FBC 1
WTTG 1
LANGUAGE
English 53
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)
countries. the resolution is expected to be voted on later this month. >> n.s.a. leader edward snowden is speaking up and reaching out. the germans are interested in bringing him to berlin if he tells them about the surveillance of german chancellor angela merkel. >> david chater reports from moscow. >> edward snowden shows every sign of going native. the snapshot showing him enjoying a river cruise in moscow. he held a meeting with an mp from the green party. he said their discussions were revealing. at a press conference the mp said edward snowden would about willing to go germany as a witness to the bugging of angela merkel's phone by the u.s. >> translation: he told me he could imagine coming to germany if it was clear he could remain here in safety. this means granting free passage and asylum. the interior minister could offer this and fulfil the moral obligation to help him. >> it's reported edward snowden is starting a job in st. petersburg as a technical advisor to russia's version of facebook. he may not be happy with the news that the federal security service in moscow is be
not been a highlight of the edward snowden documents but shows how america is using the information to collect foreign information. >> p.j. crowley, european leaders are expressing outrage. how much of that is legitimate ? how many of them had known that this is happening? >> well, there is an intelligence issue, and beneath the surface there is a deep relationship among intelligence that sve american interests as well as european interests, a lot of cooperation and information sharing, which is why there has been progress in combating terrorism. we're in a better position than, say, 12 years ago. the united states has been through this before with wikileaks. you had 250,000 state department documents, many classified cables. you've got awkward conversations. how could european leaders say how could you call me vain. but obviously at the end of the day interest drive relationships but politics makes relationships. you're seeing steps being taken politically to try to manage this, and stabilize the situation. it will obviously take some ti time. >> mike rogers, chairman of the intell
. >>> coming up on "new day," a few proceed from edward snowden. he says he's no criminal. wait until you hear our response from the leaders in the nation's capitol. he says he is sorry for past mistakes for smoking co-cable. he will not resign and he wants the public to see the alleged evidence. t thing i need. seriously? let's take this puppy over to midas and get you some of the good 'ol midas touch. hey you know what? i'll drive! i really didn't think this through. brakes, tires, oil, everything. (whistling) hall we do is go out to dinner.? that's it? i mean, he picks up the tab every time, which is great...what? he's using you. he probably has a citi thankyou card and gets 2x the points at restaurants. so he's just racking up points with me. some people... ugh! no, i've got it. the citi thankyou preferred card. now earn 2x the points on dining out and entertainment, with no annual fee.to apply, go to citi.com/thankyoucards american express credit card, every purchase earns you 2% cash back, which is deposited in your fidelity account. is that it? actually... there's no annual fee and no l
recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever i mean. it's starting to sound more like that at least. >> well, his father, lawrence snowden, came to visit him a few weeks back and said he was doing very well in russia, he was grateful to the russian authorities for having granted him asylum that he felt he could lead a normal life here and that he was able to find a job here, and there have been a lot of companies who have been public about the fact that they've been looking to recruit edward snowden. he's obviously a name that you would want to have up there on your text specitech specialist and the russian version of facebook tried to recruit him earlier on. t
.s. ambassadors protested the military move. >>> edward snowden wants the u.s. to stop treating him like a traitor. that's a letter he sent to german chancellor angela merkel. the former nsa contractor being recruited by germany as a witness into merkel's cell phone tap. >>> rebuilding after massive wildfires is a daunting task, but scientists are working on plants after wildfires. this is a report on seeds of success. >> reporter: when a wildfires ignites containment is the first priority. record high temperatures coupled with dry weather whipped up more than a dozen wildfires in colorado this summer. but what happens once the fire is extinguished could be the difference between it fueling more wildfires or preventing them. this is a site of the june 2012 pine ridge wildfire. >> it burned about 14,000 acres in the course of a few days. one day in particular. 10,000 acres burned. >> reporter: andrea is a conservation scientist with the chicago bow tannic garden. >> one problem is invasive species, but its run of the things that helped cause or carry this wildfire further than it otherwise. >> repo
is that these reports were based on the misreading of a single slide released by edward snowden. and that slide showing these numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, i in of this meta data, that's with a it was. not phone call or conten was done by european services, not by the nsa. that it was not in fact the citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> the assertions by spain, italy, that nsa collected ten of million of phone call are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect, they're saying that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing. the misinterpretation, erin, of a single power point slid
edward snowden. also the best and worst places in the world to grow old. we'll take a look at where seniors are struggling - ahead. ed d . >>> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm jonathan betz with the headlines tonight. charges have been filed against a suspect in the lax shooting that killed a t.s.a. officer. if convicted 23-year-old paul ciancia could face the death penalty. authorities say he left a note at the scene. >> he made a conscious decision to kill multiple t.s.a. in the employe employees, addressing them staying that he want to instill fear in their minds. >> healthcare.gov is down for maintenance - the website used to enrol in the insurance program and will be offline until 9am sunday morning. pakistan's wanted man was buried. taliban chief hakimullah mehsud was killed by a u.s. drone yesterday. supporters have threatened suicide bombings in revenge. hakimullah mehsud's death has pakistani politicians concerned about the future of peace talks with the taliban. we have more from peshawar. >> this is seen as a blow to the taliban pakistan, which may have a struggle
resident, edward snowden. spain is the latest nation, demanding answers from the u.s. danielle nottingham reports from wjz -- for wjz, from washington, d.c. >> reporter: a del delegation of diplomats arrived. >> i think we have to make a clear distinction between fighting together terrorism, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor, edward snowden, leaked documents, revealing that the u.s. tapped german chancellor angla merkel's private cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department analyst james louis said the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the info
police went to his house by missed him by a matter of minutes. >>> plus edward snowden says the united states should cut him some slack. the white house says, think again. >>> and a scary moment during the texans colts game last night. >> year all very worried. we went back out. they told us that he was -- he was all right. he was stable. >> houston os head coach gary kubiak collapses on the field at halftime. what could have happened? "newsroom" continues now. >>> good morning. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for joining me. we have a better idea of just how -- of how -- just how troubled the l.a.x. shooting suspect paul ciancia was days before his deadly rampage. today he's in critical condition and unable to speak to investigators. but a woman who knows him and his roommates spoke exclusively to cnn. she said he and to be unraveling the days before the shooting and he was already making plans. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he was going back home. either that his dad was sick nsd had to deal with family is
n.s.a. leaker edward snowden is that the u.s. government apparently monitored the phone calls of at least 30 world leaders, including most infamously, german chancellor angela merkel, who was holding up a new encrypted cell phone to say you can't touch me now. a little m.c. hammer there. brit, we've heard about mass data collection. but when you're talking about targeted, the phones of our allies, our friends, people that president obama sits in the oval office with and at summits with, is that over the line? >> do we know if the phones were being actually listened in on and calls recorded and the substance of the calls noted? or is this another case where we have her phone calls, we know whom she called and when and for how long they spoke? my own guess is that it is that which i'veñr just described. and moreover, this has been going on for a long time in one way or another. we spy on foreign leaders, theyñr spy on our leaders or try to. we're better at it perhaps than they are and they don't like it. now it is out in the open. the people affected have to be indignant, and
edwards snowden and a lot has changed since then, especially for the people who helped leak the information. jonathan betz has a look at that story. >> it's a global story that began in the summer with edward snowden. he is now in asylum in russia but the scandal keeps unfolding because he reported handed over almost all of his secrets to two journalists, greenwald who is based in brazil. he keeps breaking stories printed in papers all over the world, usually until countries where they will make the biggest splash. greenwald works as a columnist for the guardian. on thursday, he is leaving that british paper to help start a new journalistic venture funded by the founder of ebay. that site will likely continue revealing nsa stories. his reporting partner will join him there. she was actually the first to connecticut with snowden but works mainly behind the scenes. she is a film maker putting together a documentary about all of this and then there is julian assange. he had a minor role. nudge went to wikileaks but he did help him avoid u.s. authorities. he remained holed up in
correct because of some of the issues that edward snowden has been able to put out. their mission lately has been to try to make the american people more aware of the terrorist plots that have been foiled because of their action. over theseen red chili summer and even this week general alexander and director clapper be more forthright over the plot that have been foiled third if you count europe, it gets into the couple dozen area. that is something we have to be able to put out there to give reassurance to people like your that the intelligence community are doing all they can to protect us from international terrorism. host: our guest, michael allen, managing director of beacon global strategies, author of "blinking red -- crisis and compromise in american intelligence after 9/11." former majority staff, other position similar to that as well. south carolina, democrat line. caller: hi, pedro. i had a comment and a question for mr. allen. you are uniquely qualified to answer my question. that ient is added up is am a retired master sergeant, and the phrase plausible deniability -- that
that several agency across asia were part of the spying. >> edward snowden wants to help germany figure out if the u.s. tapped angela merkel's cell phone. he offered to help with the investigation and even offered to be a witness. the official says "he knows a lot." he is prepared to come to germ my and give testimony. the official says snowden insists that before coming to germany, "conditions must be discussed." he sent the a personal letter to merkel, which will be red publicly today. >> powerful storms pound the parts of ohio. >> the severe weather is expected to last through tonight, as well. ten people were injured. strong winds damages businesses and downed power lines. the storm caused flash floods on wednesday in sections of texas that left two dead. tornado warnings have been issued, high went gusts are also expected in new york and new england. >> let's bring in our meteorologist. >> very busy system here. what can we expect. >> very busy, we have close to 200 reports, five being tornadoes, close to 150 being wind reports, and also multiple reports of hail across much of the coun
operates outside of the country. >> this move comes after nsa leaker edward snowden indicated the u.s. was eavesdropping on german chancellor angela merkel and 34 other foreign leaders. dozens of pages of top secret u.s. documents were declassified on monday. in an parent bid to show the nsa was acting legally when it gathered millions of americans phone record. >>> the obama administration is granting a six-week extension to americans who want to sign. for obama care coverage. the new deadline is march 13st and extended because the website has a number of problems. we are told the website is back up and running now. >>> when it comes to terrorism the future looks frightening. cnn obtaining a sobering new report that reveals casualty and attacks are on the rise. as chris lawrence reports, there is no end in sight to that troubling trend. >> reporter: it's not your imagination. terrorists are launching more attacks like this deadly assault on a nairobi mall. and it's likely the world will see even more violence next year. cnn obtained exclusive access to an upcoming report from stark
were monitored. thee tails from documents revealed by former nsa contractor edward snowden. james clapper promised to prove the government has been acting appropriately. >> we know the public wants to know whether the government can be trusted to use this appropriately. we believe we have been lawful. >> democratic senator dianne feinstein says she will launch a review of the gathering. bipartisan legislation would scale back massive sweep of phone records. >>> an apology from the head of medicare. she faced harsh questioning from lawmakers. medicare chief says the problems can be fixed and the site would soon work as promised. there are wide spread reports people unable to log on or purchase coverage. texas republican kevin brady asked for a guarantee no american would excombreerns a gap in coverage. >> we have a system working. we're going to improve the speed of the system. >> excuse me? >> yes. >> you're saying system right now is working? >> i'm saying it's working. just not at the speed we want. and at success rate we want. >> she declined to say how many have been able to e
of revelations by former nsa analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the nsa has been collecting phone calls and text mess inls of millions of citizens. congressman james sensesenbrenner, the author of the "the patriot act" is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, stopping dragnet collection of phone calls from citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is tarted and appoint an advocate to the courts protecting rights. the director of national intelligence, james clapper, and national security director keith alexander told the committee the content of phone calls was secret in a lock box, unless there is a link to terrorism. and that, they say, is rare. >> there would only be looked at if we had reasonable and artic u la ble suspicious that we had connection to a foreign, al qaeda-related group, and look into the box. in 2012 we had 2088 such selectors, that we could look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing there was relatively little discussion about allegations that the u.s. spied on america's allies. at the white
and question edward snowden. germany wants to know how extensive the spying of the national security agency was. and berlin officials want snowden to show him the original documents that he has leaked. >>> in his weekly address, president obama talked about the need to pass a budget that includes spending on education and research. he said a budget shouldn't be cut just for the sake of cutting. >> remember our deficits are getting smaller, not bigger. on my watch they are falling at the fastest pace in 60 years. that gives us room to fix our long term debt problems without sticking it to young people or undermining our bedrock retirement and health security programs. >> house and senate budget negotiators want to divert a new round of cuts. >>> if you want to go online to check on the affordable health care plans tonight you're out of luck. the health insurance website is off line until tomorrow morning. a technology team will be working on >>> there is no reason for wine lovers to panic. there were 300 million cases last year. down 5% from the year before. it's the lowest level since the 1960s
they would love to go to russia to question edward snowden. germany wants to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national security agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original documents the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has spied on leaders of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >> one of the original mercury 7 astronauts has been laid to rest. scott carpenter, seen here on the far left, died from complications of a stroke. he was 88. john glenn, another mercury astronaut, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth, and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized insurance rates under obamacare. but equally important is the free care that's now available to many more people under med e cal, the state's version of medicaid. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> nora is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford i
to question edward snowden. they would like to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original documents the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has speed -- spied on leader of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >> one of the original mercury astronaughts has been laid to rest. mr. carpenter was 88 years old. john glenn, another mercury astronaut, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized insurance rates under the affordable care act but equally important is the insurance that's available to many under this program. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> nora is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford it. this is really, you know, caused a lot of problems in the family because it's not only me, it's my family, my husband, my kids
the finish line in central park. >>> german officials say they would love to go to russia to question edward snowden. they would like to know exactly how extensive the spying of the national agency was. berlin officials also want snowden to show them the original document the former nsa analysts has leaked. records show the u.s. has speed on leaders of 35 countries, including german's chancellor, angela merkel. >>> one of the original astronauts has been laid to rest, mr. car penaltyter was 88. john glenn, you see there, another mercury 7 members, was among the mourners yesterday. he was the second american to orbit the earth and later had a successful career as an aquanaut. >>> much has been written about the new subsidized ratesnd the affordable care act but equally important is the insurance that's available to many under this program. michael finney tells us what it takes to qualify. >> she is get hearing blood sugar level checked. this preventative care is something she might not have done in the past. >> i couldn't afford it. it caused a lot of problems in the family because not only m
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
. word from edward snowden that the u.s. has eavesdropped on frenchmen, even on angela merkel's cell phone. a furious merkel called president obama to complain. >> the president spoke to angela merkel, reassured her that the president is not and will not monitor the chancellor's communications. >> reporter: but the white house did not deny that it had happened. >> is not monitoring, will not monitor. i think you're missing a tense there. you've got your president progressive there, you got your simple future, but you're missing your past progressive. >> reporter: the secretary of state has been putting out fires here, there and everywhere. especially over u.s. policy toward syria. after two years of war and the assad regime's chemical attack killing more than a thousand civilians, including children, the saudis accused president obama of backing down, even helping assad butcher his own people. >> the shameful way that the world community accepts the impunity of the butcher of syria is a blot on the conscience of the world. >> reporter: furious that the u.s. did not carry out its thre
to the united states as a result of the disclosures of the surveilance the nsa surveilance program by edward snowden. let's listen in. >> but the disclosures for better or for worse have lowered the threshold for discussing these matters in public. so to the degree that we can discuss them, we will. but this public discussion should be based on an accurate understanding of the intelligence community who we are, what we do, and how we're overseen. the last few months, the manner in which our activities have been characterized has often been inaccurate or misleading or some combination thereof. i believe most americans realize the intelligence community exists to collect the vital intelligence that helps protect our nation from foreign threats. we focus on uncovering the secret plans and intensions of our adversaries as we've been charged to do. but what we do not do is spy unlawfully on americans or the iz krz of any country. we only spy for valid foreign intelligence purposes as authorized by law with multiple layers of oversight to insure we don't abuse our authorities. unfortunately, this
put it together, it is a lot of jerns. so a give like edward snowden could leach out a lot of intelligence just by in that field in russia. >> which is an interesting point wi . maybe they sell hats but it could be their version of the nsa. you don't always say you are what you are. that brings me to the point. we don't know what the job. is his attorney said they're with holding it for security reasons. how valuable, tim, do you think snowden is at this point as an intelligence asset for the russians? >> he is of great value. just his knowledge of how he got hired. the process of his hiring. the type of work he did. the personnel he worked. with all of those things, there's a arraign why when you're in the intelligence communicate and you have a top secret clearance or a clearance above that, why pillow talk is banned. everyone you associate. with any foreign nationals you associate with all have to be reported. the agencies have to look at that and to see if there is a possible envelope being built around that you could sap information from you. so whether he intentionall
, but not spying on friends. >> reporter: former national security agency contractor edward snowden leaked documents revealing the u.s. tapped german chancellor awningle -- angella merkel's cell phone. president obama steered clear of the controversy, as he helped swear in his new fbi director. but the white house is saying, u.s. intelligence gather suggest under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing, spying on allies could have economic consequences, as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. >> reporter: former state department james lewis says the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post-9/11 world, the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means less successful successful -- more successful attacks. >> reporter: danielle nottingham, wjz eyewitness news. >> some u.s. lawmakers are defending the spying practices. they argue places like france are safer because of the n
security agency contractor edward snowden leaked documents revealing the u.s. capped german chancellor angela merkel's cell phone and eavesdropped on more than 60 million private conversations in spain in just one month. president obama steered clear of the controversy as he helped swear in his new fbi director, but the white house is saying u.s. intelligence gathering is under review. >> the president clearly feels strongly about making sure that we are not just collecting information because we can, but because we should. >> reporter: besides being embarrassing spying on allies could have economic consequences as washington works to negotiate a major trade deal with the european union. former state department analyst james lewis says the u.s. won't stop the program because in a post 9/11 world the information is too valuable. >> this makes us safer. less surveillance means more successful attacks. >> reporter: the white house hopes to complete its surveillance review by the end of the year. danielle nottingham, cbs news, washington. >> the head of the health and intelligence commi
that they felt that way in covering this important story in mali. >> n.s.a. whistle blower edward snowden sounding off. >> we're going to tell you what's in his open letter. why he's asking the u.s. for clemency. >> it feels like 2012 all over again. mitt romney attacking president obama over health care. why the former presidential candidate jumped into the debate. >> a special look at aging around the globe, starting in afghanistan, where life expectancy is among the lowest in the world. >> we're taking a live look at egypt right now. the protests there, you can see breaking up very quickly, just an hour ago. we saw hundreds of people outside of the courthouse where mohamed morsi's trial has just been adjourned to the new year. we'll be right back. >> good morning. welcome back to aljazeera america. >> some democrats in washington are worried they're going to lose jobs over the ongoing n.s.a. scandal. we'll talk with an experienced democratic strategist. >> let's get a look at what temperatures we can expect to see across the nation. i'm he can specking a lot of low temperatures. >> a l
in germany. provided the site of former nsa contractor in -- edward snowden. of 2013, but not the content. caller: great job. a listen to every morning. i just came back from europe. i know it is going on over there. -- of the isu right now, we are the most powerful country in the world are defined the president of the united states says two things i want to do. a nice dinner here and then let them know that we are not playing games with you because if you ever put a missile in my country, i will blow your head off and that is it. and it is done. you said that he just came back from overseas echo what part? caller: athens. any reactions as to how the story is playing out over there? caller: i was born there 50 years ago. .he people create the problem we keeping the same politicians back over and over again. because justts revises like everybody else, my god. give the other guy chance to get in there, to serve his country. ray from loma linda california. he is on our independent line. caller: good morning, just briefly, as far as buying is concerned i think there's a number of issues to co
by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. host: kevin on twitter asks -- guest: you're caller earlier talked about the boston bo
edward snowden. host: if you want to read more on that story, that is the front page of the "washington post." the front page of today's "usa just a little bit from that piece. host: that story in today's "usa today." on this subject of the hearings yesterday, play more calls and comments, some e-mails coming in. if you watched the hearing, you know a lot more about how wonderful it is that millions more will be covered. ,ecretary sebelius was direct and the congress representatives showed their hate and anger and. mona this morning -- hate and ignorance. mona this morning e-mailing entered we go to stanley on our line for democrats. good morning. caller: happy thursday. enemy and it is us. it is amazing be caller's and a lack of knowledge. i mean, they are basically regurgitating partyline talking points. we need to do a lot more research and a lot more looking into the real facts. i think sebelius did an excellent job of answering the questions. by the way, i think history will rate obama in the top 10 presidents. we just need to do more research. ok, we go to raymond from george on o
of "the washington journal." a continued clashed over the nsa -- spying leaks from edward snowden. this is the front page of "the financial times." the issue came up yesterday with the heads of the intelligence committee in the house and senate. they were asked if perhaps they would agree with some calls that have been made for edward snowden to receive clemency if he came home to the u.s. to testify in an investigation of the nsa. we will play a little bit of what chairman mike rogers and senator dianne feinstein said in that interview. [video clip] this was an all, american, contractor who was trusted and he stripped our system. if he wasopportunity a whistleblower, to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee and say i have some information you ought to see. maybeld certainly see him both together, maybe separately, but we would have seen him and we would have looked at that information. that did not happen. now he has done this an armistice service to our country. norma's disservice in this country and i believe in no clemen
, a bombshell out of germany, edward snowden, america's most wanted document leaker, wants to testify before congress, the american congress. snowden, whose nsa leaks are still rattling cages met with a german lawmaker in moscow. fred pleitgen is in germany with more. >> reporter: hi, carol. i have the letter, it's interesting because it doesn't mention germany by name. the operative part of this letter says "i hope when the difficulties of this humanitarian situation" meaning the limbo he's in, in russia "have been resolved and i will be able to cooperate in the responsible finding of fact regarding the reports in the media" that of course pertains to the documents behind a lot of the media reports regarding the nsa for instance spying on the german chancellor but a lot of other things disclosed recently and from that and from his talks with edward snoweden this german lawmakers discerns that snowden would be able to travel to germany to testify in front of german parliament about the leaks coming out or perhaps stay in russia and have members of german parliament come there. there are a lo
an end to secrecy. first you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has caused an international uproar. x you wonder whether the government can preserve some of the secrets -- it makes you wonder whether the government can preserve some of these secrets. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. we could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government needs to do and our own freedom and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in guaranteed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? guest: you have to ask him erie -- ask him. i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do y
's lack of honesty has put his second term in peril. edward snowden has this new manifesto that is out from russia, calls for reform in surveillance justify his leaks of classified information. we will see if he agrees with him on that. and the changing landscape of designer fashion. the top names in the country, here with us this hour to talk about that. all that and dagen mcdowell this hour on "markets now." all right. dagen: we're giving you a makeover. connell: that would be great. get him to work on that.
of europe's scorn. the white house can thank nsa leaker, edward snowden. president obama has had to apologize to hollande, merkel, and current and former leaders in mexico and president ruseff who even canceled a state visit to washington she was so angry. while the nsa scandal is also causing protests at home, with european allies, it could cost serious money. the european union, america's largest trading partner, is threatening to cancel pending trade talks in the u.s. >> when we're doing this in germany, france, great britain, other nations we've been allied with in fighting al qaeda, invading libya, these kinds of things just trample trust. >> the administration and its defenders say most of the spying is legitimate for the protection of the u.s. and its allies. >> so a bad guy in afghanistan can use networks in france or germany or great britain or the united states and plan operations with somebody else who may be in afghanistan, but you could still use all of those networks. >> the nsa has issued an unusual denial of one british report that said president obama had been to
as a victory by people like edward snowden and gl glenn greenwald. >> did you talk to glenn at all? it seems a narrow view when he says is angela merkel a terrorist. you hear from the obama administration side that these intelligence services do a lot more than just only try to intercept communications amongst terrorists. there's a lot more to it. >> right. exactly. a lot of it is about the economic side. a lot of it is, you know, just trying to figure out who's meeting who and what's going on. clearly since 9/11 you and i both know that the emphasis has been on trying to disrupt any kind of plots or plans or conspiracies to commit harm against the united states, either in the u.s. or around the world. and against u.s. allies. so that is why prime minister cameron and other strong u.s. allies have been very robust in their defense of this kind of data collection. we also know that, yes, angela merkel is a strong u.s. ally, but in the past, germany has had, obviously with east germany, it was a communist country, so a lot of spying was done in relation to that. its relations and its trade and
is for david ignatius for sure. new reporting confirms what edward snowden leaked last week that the scope extends to some of america's closest allies abroad. the "wall street journal" reports that the national security agency ended a program that spied on as many as 35 world leaders after the white house ordered a review over the summer. officials say several programs have been shut down and others are expected to be close to the later date. the report states president obama spent nearly five years in office in the dark. unaware of the nsa's practices overseas. the targets of the programs are not decided by the president, but by the agency. yesterday congressman peter king defended the program saying they should be viewed as a positive thing for everyone involved. >> i think the president should stop apologizing and being defensive. the nsa saved thousands of lives not just in the united states, but in france and germany and throughout europe. we are not doing this for the fun of it, but to gather intelligence that helps not just us. >> there reports out of germany that the president did
this out, maintaining relevance in the arena, it should have been better by not allowing edward snowden to steal the documents that he stole from our country. "the guardian," is operating in its own best interest. they have inherited stolen goods, stolen information, and ind to be held accountable informing the world of these instances. what was stolen, we have tried as best we can to figure out what all he does have, but we are really at the mercy of "the guardian" as to how they roll the revelations out and how they spin them. it is a mostly inaccurate portrayal of that data. do you and the intelligence communities know exactly what he has? guest: no, he could have some stuff that we are not aware of. host: do you have an idea a echo -- id a? guest: -- idea? guest: we do in some instances, but not everything. host: they still cannot answer that question? guest: not definitively. no one can answer that question. host: how is it that that is not possible? there is a lot of it that he took over a long. of time. host: so, there is more to come? guest: i do not know, in infinite wisdom. ho
operating. and the leaks which stemmed from information from former nsa contractor edward snowden just keep coming. two spanish newspapers say the nsa secretly monitored 60 million phone calls in spain just in one month. here in washington, mixed reaction from lawmakers. >> this whole notion that we're going to go after each other on what is really legitimate protection of nation/state interests, i think is disingenuous. >> we have repair work to do. >> reporter: abc news, washington. >>> congress now looking into the case against amanda knocks. two lawmakers from her state of washington holding a panel discussion on capitol hill as the retrial of knox is underway in italy without her. knox was convicted of killing her british roommate in 2009. her sentence was overturned after she served of course years. an italian court ordered a new trial. >>> a federal judge in texas has struck down a major part of the state's restrictive new abortion law. advocates say a provision requiring doctors to have admitting privileges at a hospital less than 30 miles away would have shuttered about 1/3 of the
spies here. the problem is you can't get caught. somewhere in russia edward snowden is smiling right now, coming up in congressional testimony like we've heard. so this has really thrown off the -- thrown the white house off balance. at first, the president was saying the nsa is not spying on americans. now they've have to deal with spying on foreign leaders. that's been the big problem. >> okay. bob cusack, thank you very much. coming up next, the cnn film "blackfish" has sparked a nationwide debate over what should be done with killer whales in captivity. there's been a huge push to set the whales free. the big question is, once the whales are released back into the ocean, what happens next? we investigate that after the break. it's a growing trend in business: do more with less with less energy. hp is helping ups do just that. soon, the world's most intelligent servers, designed by hp, will give ups over twice the performance, using forty percent less energy. multiply that across over a thousand locations, and they'll provide the same benefit to the environment as over 60,000 trees. t
you had the wiki leaks, private manning, and now you have edward snowden who has ansed and international -- international uproar. there are young people who have other ideas and they are willing to take the risk of putting them out. it is an interesting and relatively new development that makes it hard. some secrets should be kept, but it is a question of degree. it looks as though the nsa was doing too much. they have to do some things, obviously. there has to be a balance between security and freedom. could live in a police state where the government knew everything. there has to be a balance between what the government freedom do and our own and civil liberties and rights. they happen to be guerin teed in a thing called the constitution of the united states. host: is glenn greenwald a journalist or an activist? erie: you have to ask him it i think he is a little bit of both. host: why do you say that? guest: he made no secret that he has a point of view. that means he is an activist. he was also writing for "the guardian." papers a liberal, leftish which has done som
secret until edward snowden leaked details earlier this year and ignited a fierce public debate over the extent of nsa snooping. under the bill, written by diane feinstein, they can continue collecting and snooping as they have. they will now need congressional approval. they will need to determine whether the snooping reduces any leads. run when ars can be terrorist target called an american phone number. this protects the country, according to mrs. feinstein. i do not believe this is an imposition on people's privacy rights. diana is calling from call for now. -- california. independent line. caller: health care and how badly it was rolled out. lied to us.ey'd they told us that this was going to be great for everyone. people are losing their health care. people have not apologized. going around is saying how great everything is. he is not out here. he is in his bubble in washington. he does not understand why people are suffering out here. we are not just suffering because of the health care law, we are suffering because of his economical stuff that he has rolled out that has made
of this discussion is the source of many of these nsa disclosures, edward snowden, he's appealing to washington to stop treating him like a traitor. he made the appeal in a letter that he gave to a german politician who visited him in moscow. what do you think of snowden's request here? >> i think we've had a very important debate that's been kindled by these leaks. but i have little sympathy for mr. snowden. he's done enormous damage to the country. if he were a man of conscience as he claims to be, he would have in a civil disobedience way, face the music here at home. but he fled to those authoritarian regimes that care nothing about privacy. part of what he is doing is designed more to inflict damage on the united states than to make a cause out of privacy. >> part of that here, snowden offering to testify in germany about american eavesdropping methods. if germany grants him asylum there, what would you do to stop that? >> i hope germany won't make that decision. germany understands just as we do that we can't have people working within our intelligence community or people working within t
and what edward snowden has done? >> guest: um, i believe in whistleblowers. i mean, i do think that whistleblowers perform a public service, especially when there's corruption in government or pharmaceuticals or harming people and they step forward. i'm mixed on snowden. i am mixed. i do believe that there's certain secrets that you have to keep for the security of our country, and perhaps i've changed a little bit on that since 9/11. but i don't know quite what to make on the snowden thing. parts of it, parts of his disclosures i think have gotten us into a national debate and conversation that's constructive and good. and i don't know about the rest. i'm sorry to -- i'm not copping out, i just simply haven't come down hard on one side or the other. >> host: about 30 minutes left in our interview with kitty kelley, this month's "in depth" guest on booktv. phil in north hollywood, california, good afternoon. >> caller: hi there, peter. really love your show. i always get some new insight from writers that i've known or just discovered. ms. kelley, just curious to know with all
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 53 (some duplicates have been removed)